Congratulations to David Phipps!

Today York’s YFile released a story about Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal winners at York. We are pleased to let you know that David Phipps (RIR-York) was among the recipients!

David Phipps at the Diamond Jubilee ceremony

The medals, which are awarded to individuals in tribute to their achievements and significant contributions to Canada, are part of a global celebration of the 60th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. David received his medal in connection to Mitacs, a national research organization offering research and training programs to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in Canada. He received his medal at a special ceremony held late last month in Ottawa, Ontario.

As the executive director of Research & Innovation Services at York University, David manages all research grants and contracts including knowledge and technology transfer.  He was recognized with the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his work in knowledge mobilization. In 2011, he was named the most influential knowledge mobilizer in Canada and in 2012 York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit was awarded a best practice award from the European-based Knowledge Economy Network.

David leads York’s award-winning Knowledge Mobilization Unit that provides services to researchers, community organizations and government agencies that wish to use research to inform public policy and professional practice. He also leads ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche, Canada’s knowledge mobilization network, which includes Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador, Université du Québec à Montréal, York University, University of Guelph, University of Saskatchewan and University of Victoria.

The full YFile story can be read here.

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York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit wins Best Practice Award

The following story appeared in York University’s YFile on June 12, 2012.  It is reposted here with permission. 

On June 12, 2012, York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit received the Knowledge Economy Network Best Practice Award from the European-based Knowledge Economy Network (KEN). The award, which was part of a group announced by the network was presented during the network’s annual forum, which took place June 11 and 12, in Maribor, Slovenia.

KEN is an European nonprofit association that acts as a “network of 16 European regions and countries, interested in boosting their knowledge-based competitiveness, exchanging good practice, encouraging collaboration and implementing new knowledge into innovative products in response to a larger, global need to enhance and support efforts to build knowledge economy, not only at European, but at a truly international level.”

In addition to national level awards recognizing innovation in the four domains of education, research & development, innovation, entrepreneurship, plus one media award, the three Best Practice Awards announced this year went to:

  • European Affairs Fund, AP Vojvodina, based in Serbia, which KEN described as “an example of good practice in multicultural education”
  • Knowledge Mobilization Unit at York University, which was cited by the network as ”an example of good practice of a new scheme run by the University and involving all triple helix [government, community and industry] partners”
  • South East European Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning, based in Croatia, which KEN highlighted as ”an example of good practice in successful regional cooperation in training and education”

“This recognition from a European agency is testament to the growing international reputation that York is gaining for its work in knowledge mobilization,” said Robert Haché, York’s vice-president research & innovation. “Knowledge mobilization connects researchers and students with partners, so that their research and expertise can be applied to real-world challenges, in addition to helping to inform decisions about public policy and social services.”

Under the leadership of David Phipps, director of research services & knowledge exchange in York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit, the unit has been developing and delivering knowledge mobilization services to faculty, students and their research partners since 2006. The unit has received funding from the Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Working with 240 faculty, 142 students and 205 partner organizations, the Knowledge Mobilization Unit has brokered more than 250 collaborations between the academy and non-academic partners. These partnerships have attracted more than $1 million in sponsored research funding specifically for York research, and over $1 million in funding for community partners.

Michael Johnny, manager of the Knowledge Mobilization Unit, supports all large-scale grant applications, which in turn has secured over $17 million in external research support for York faculty and their partners. Some of these collaborations are maturing into social innovations that help find new ways to address persistent social and economic challenges.

  • In 2009 Nottawasaga Futures, a nonprofit community development agency, called York University’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit to help a rural business in making green decisions. The collaboration helped launch the Green Economy Centre.
  • York supported a collaboration between graduate student Tanya Gulliver and the Parkdale Activity & Recreation Centre in 2007. Research conducted by this partnership is now helping to inform Toronto’s Heat Registry Manual, which will assist more than 2.5-million people cope in an increasingly warming world.
  • When the Regional Municipality of York called the Knowledge Mobilization Unit to seek support in evaluating how they delivered services to immigrants, York supported a collaboration between two faculty members and municipal policy-makers. The evaluation undertaken provided evidence to the regional government, which in turn informed the region’s decision to invest more than $20 million to expand the Welcome Centre program. The investment created 86 jobs and provided 48,000 services to new Canadians living and working in York Region, which is home to Canada’s fastest-growing newcomer population.

“Knowledge mobilization identifies and supports these collaborations,” said Phipps. “The Welcome Centres, Heat Registry and Green Economy Centre are examples of social innovation.”

As a result of these and other stories of the impact of research, Phipps is widely sought as a speaker on York’s model for knowledge mobilization, which is increasingly becoming recognized as a critical component of engaged scholarship and learning.

To watch Phipps’ acceptance speech for the Economy Network Best Practice Award, click here.

New Knowledge Mobilization Award at UVic / Nouveau prix afin de reconnaître l’excellence en matière de mobilisation des connaissances

Dale Anderson, RIR-UVic

The University of Victoria has a new award to recognize excellence in knowledge mobilization by UVic researchers. The Craigdarroch Award for Excellence in Knowledge Mobilization is currently accepting nominations for the 2012 award. This award replaces the former Craigdarroch Awards for Excellence in Societal Contribution, and Excellence in Communicating Research. 

L’Université de Victoria compte sur un nouveau prix afin de reconnaître l’excellence en matière de mobilisation des connaissances par les chercheurs de l’Université, le Prix Craigdarroch. Les mises en candidatures sont ouvertes pour l’édition 2012. Ce prix remplace l’ancien Prix Craigdarroch récompensant l’excellence de la contribution à la société, et l’excellence en communication de la recherche.

The University of Victoria has a new award to recognize excellence in knowledge mobilization by UVic researchers.

The Craigdarroch Award for Excellence in Knowledge Mobilization is currently accepting nominations for the 2012 award. This award replaces the former Craigdarroch Awards for Excellence in Societal Contribution, and Excellence in Communicating Research.

The new award will recognize a significant project or body of work that demonstrates excellence in Knowledge Mobilization (KM). At the University of Victoria, KM is defined as “the purposeful exchange and application of knowledge developed through an ongoing process of research and/or creative and artistic endeavor for the benefit of society.” KM applies across the academy and includes the dissemination of both basic and applied research as well as the full range of creative and artistic activities undertaken by faculty members. The concept of societal benefit resulting from KM is equally comprehensive, ranging from advances within academic disciplines, to community engaged research, to advances affecting wider society through social, economic, humanistic and/or environmental improvements.

The Craigdarroch Research Awards are named for Craigdarroch Castle, which was home to Victoria College from 1921 to 1946. These annual awards are an opportunity to recognize those who have been instrumental in original, productive, entrepreneurial and ground-breaking research at the University of Victoria.

For more information and nomination forms, please see the website.

UVic KMb award / Le Prix de l’Université de Victoria en mobilisation des connaissances

Dr. Catherine Mateer of UVic is the inaugural recipient of a new knowledge mobilization award from the BC Psychological Association, created in her name-the Catherine Mateer Scientist-Practitioner Award – to recognize her work in helping people who have suffered problems with memory, attention and self-regulation following car accidents, falls and blows to the head.

Le docteur Catherine Mateer de l’Université de Victoria est la toute première récipiendaire du nouveau Prix en mobilisation des connaissances remis par la BC Psychological Association. Il s’agit d’un prix créé en son honneur – le Prix chercheur-praticien Catherine Mateer –visant à reconnaître son travail auprès des personnes ayant souffert de problèmes de mémoire, d’attention et d’auto-régulation à la suite d’un accident de la route, d’une chute ou d’un coup à la tête.

Media Release

Award Honours UVic Psychology Pioneer Catherine Mateer

Acclaimed clinical neuropsychology professor and University of Victoria administrator Dr. Catherine Mateer is the inaugural recipient of a new award from the BC Psychological Association, created in her name-the Catherine Mateer Scientist-Practitioner Award.

Mateer is widely known for her groundbreaking work in the area of cognitive rehabilitation for survivors of head trauma. She has helped people who have suffered problems with memory, attention and self-regulation following car accidents, falls and blows to the head. Her work in neuroscience has demonstrated the tremendous neuroplasticity of the brain that can help people compensate for problems, leading to better recoveries and more independence.

“In my work with people who are experiencing cognitive impairments as a result of brain injury, I have always tried to use scientific theory and methods to develop new interventions and to evaluate their effectiveness,” says Mateer. “The work has been rewarding in and of itself, but to be recognized by a science-practitioner award named for me is an incredible honour.”

The BC Psychological Association created the award to recognize individuals who have made significant and distinguished advancements in the field of psychology using a scientist-practitioner model to bridge science with the application to real people in real situations.

Mateer is a professor in UVic’s Department of Psychology, a previous director of Clinical Training and former departmental chair, and is currently UVic’s associate vice-president for academic planning. She has authored three books and over 100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Most of them address the management of acquired impairments in memory, attention, executive functions, emotional adjustment and behavioural self-regulation. Mateer is also known for her kind heart, generous nature and willingness to “go the extra mile” for students, clients, colleagues and staff.

Read the media release here.