Awards for Trainees: Gender, Sex and Health Knowledge Translation Supplements / Bourses aux stagiaires: Suppléments aux stagiaires pour l’application des connaissances sur le genre, le sexe et la santé de l’ISFH

Awards for Trainees:  Gender, Sex and Health Knowledge Translation Supplements

CIHR Institute of Gender and Health (IGH) Institute Community Support Program 2013-2014

Application deadline: October 1, 2013

In keeping with our commitment to investing in world-class research excellence, the CIHR Institute of Gender and Health (IGH) is interested in training and sustaining a strong and diverse foundation of health researchers who integrate sex and gender considerations in their work.  The purpose of IGH’s Institute Community Support (ICS) Program is to build capacity for gender, sex and health research and knowledge translation among trainees, including graduate students and postdoctoral fellows across the full spectrum of health research disciplines.

The IGH Knowledge Translation (KT) Supplements (worth up to $5,000) support the capacity of trainees to engage in the knowledge translation (KT) of their own gender, sex and health research. KT initiatives eligible for this opportunity must directly advance the translation of research that is led by the applicant as part of a graduate thesis or postdoctoral project and that has a substantive focus on gender and/or sex and health. KT activities may either foster the engagement of knowledge users in the research process (integrated KT) or communicate findings from a completed research project to knowledge users (end-of-grant KT).

For more information, please visit the IGH Gender, Sex and Health Trainee Knowledge Translation Supplements page.

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Bourses aux stagiaires: Suppléments aux stagiaires pour l’application des connaissances sur le genre, le sexe et la santé de l’ISFH
l’Institut de la santé des femmes et des hommes (ISFH) des IRSC Programme d’appui communautaire des instituts 2013-2014

Date limite pour présenter une demande:  1er octobre 2013

Fidèle à son engagement d’investir dans l’excellence scientifique de calibre mondial, l’Institut de la santé des femmes et des hommes (ISFH) des IRSC souhaite former et retenir une base solide et diversifiée de chercheurs dans le domaine de la santé qui tiennent compte des notions de genre et de sexe dans leurs travaux. Le Programme d’appui communautaire de l’ISFH vise à développer les capacités de recherche et d’application des connaissances sur le genre, le sexe et la santé chez les stagiaires, y compris les étudiants des cycles supérieurs et les boursiers postdoctoraux dans l’ensemble des domaines de la recherche en santé.

Ce supplément (d’une valeur maximale de 5 000 $) permet à des stagiaires de participer à l’application des connaissances issues de leurs propres recherches sur le genre, le sexe et la santé. Les initiatives d’AC admissibles à ce supplément doivent directement faire avancer l’application de la recherche effectuée par le candidat dans le cadre d’une thèse ou d’un projet de postdoctorat avec une orientation significative sur le genre et/ou le sexe et la santé. Les activités d’AC peuvent favoriser l’engagement des utilisateurs des connaissances dans le processus de recherche (AC intégrée) ou permettre de communiquer les résultats d’un projet de recherche achevé aux utilisateurs de connaissances (AC en fin de subvention).

Pour obtenir plus d’information, consultez la page Supplément aux stagiaires pour l’application des connaissances sur le genre, le sexe et la santé de l’ISFH.

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Social Media as a Tool to Disseminate ASD Mental Health Research / Les médias sociaux comme outils pour diffuser la recherche en santé mentale sur les troubles du spectre de l’autisme

Jonathan Weiss, Faculty of Health and CIHR Chair in Autism Spectrum Disorders Treatment and Care Research, York University
Michael Johnny, RIR York

A commitment to social media can help support important messages in research being shared to diverse audiences.

 L’emploi des médias sociaux peut favoriser la diffusion à des publics divers d’importants messages issus de la recherche.

Jonathan Weiss

Jonathan Weiss

Social media is not a new medium for disseminating academic research but it is one that is relatively new and not widely utilized by academic researchers. Dr. Jonathan Weiss of York University and CIHR Chair in Autism Spectrum Disorders Treatment and Care Research has adopted social media as an important component of his collaboration, engagement and dissemination efforts. His rationale is embedded in the title of an early blog entry on his recently created ASD Mental Health blog, “Why Focus a Blog on Mental Health and Autism Spectrum Disorders? How Could We Not“? An understanding that research is only part of the continuum of desired changes to policy and practice around Autism, social media was determined to be an important tool to support engagement with project partners, research dissemination to diverse end users, and an opportunity to access additional information and contacts to continue to support the ongoing research agenda.

This is all aligned with a clear and comprehensive knowledge translation (KT) strategy for the project team. Simply put, the objectives of KT for this project are to enable research to inform decision making along the spectrum of Autism service. Informed by the leading work of Melanie Barwick who had led Scientist Knowledge Translation Training courses, an integrated KT strategy has been employed. This means ongoing engagement with stakeholders. Information will be shared in a timely manner and in relevant formats allowing for easy access to research to encourage specific recommendations to enable research to meet its objectives of helping inform policy and practice.

ASD Mental Health Chair logo

The Chair website and blog have been combined with the work of numerous project partners, to create a web of engagement that meets the needs of all involved. For ResearchImpact, this is an excellent example of how social media can be effectively used as part of a KT strategy. For the project team, it is an important tool to disseminate and access relevant information related to Autism and Mental Health research.

Visit the Chair in Autsim Spectrum Disorders Treatment and Care Research website at asdmentalhealth.ca,  the ASD Mental Health blog at asdmentalhealth.blog.yorku.ca and the complete list of research summaries at asdmentalhealth.ca/research-summaries. And watch the ResearchImpact twitter feed @researchimpact for the rest of this week, where we will be tweeting about ASD Mental Health ResearchSnapshots.

Guide to Knowledge Translation Planning at CIHR: Integrated and End-of-Grant Approaches / Guide de planification de l’application des connaissances aux IRSC : approches intégrées et de fin de subvention

ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche is pleased to announce the launch of a new Knowledge Translation (KT) Guide by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). 

Le RéseauImpactRecherche-ResearchImpact a le plaisir de vous annoncer le lancement du nouveau Guide de planification de l’application des connaissances aux Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada (IRSC).

The creation of new healthcare knowledge often does not, on its own, lead to widespread implementation or impacts on health outcomes. As Canada’s principal health research funding agency, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) plays a fundamental role in bridging the ‘know-do’ gap and ensuring that research findings get into the hands of those who can use them.

To assist in filling this gap between research evidence and implementation, CIHR has developed a new Knowledge Translation (KT) Guide that we hope will strengthen projects that involve a KT approach, while also ensuring that the review of KT within grant proposals is more rigorous and transparent.

Whether it is disseminating findings from already completed research or co-creating the knowledge to help solve issues, this Guide is relevant across the spectrum of health research. It is targeted to both those writing grants and those reviewing grants.

The Guide provides examples of how different approaches to KT have worked and includes relevant worksheets to help guide planning. The KT Guide is available on the CIHR website or in hard copy by writing to kt-ac@cihr.gc.ca.

Le Guide de l’AC est disponible sur le site Web des IRSC (http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/f/45321.html). Il est aussi possible d’en obtenir une version papier en s’adressant par écrit à kt-ac@cihr.gc.ca.

KMb Advice for Americans / Conseil sur la MdC pour les américains

By David Phipps (ResearchImpact, York)

Thanks to @KTExchange for giving David Phipps (RIR-York) the chance to speak to Americans about the Canadian KT (=KMb) secret. American citizens, community agencies and lawmakers can learn from their Canadian counterparts.

Merci à @KTExchange d’avoir donné la chance à David Phipps (RIR-York) de parler aux Américains à propos du secret canadien en matière de TC (=MdC). Les citoyens américains, les agences communautaires ainsi que les législateurs peuvent en apprendre de leurs vis-à-vis canadiens.

“Develop an engaged community sector and elect a government that will listen.”

Those were my parting words to the audience at the National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing and Media in Atlanta as we gathered to debate if the (hypothetical) Canadian KT secret is exportable to the US. I developed some preliminary thinking about this in a recent blog where I proposed the US needs a social Bayh Dole Act to mandate KT on American campuses.

A social Bayh Dole Act would focus on public good as an outcome. It would not encourage the false promise of private gain from the commercialization of university research inherent in Bayh Dole mediated technology transfer. A social Bayh Dole Act will require a paradigm shift of engagement in civic and academic America. We heard from the audience that US Foundations and charities are fragmented, do not speak with a unified voice and do not collaborate on funding research projects. We also heard that in a commercialized and competitive health care system there is not a culture of sharing and collaboration, both necessary antecedents of successful KT.

The health charities in Canada were critical in the transition from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). It is because of Canadian health charities that CIHR has the 13 Institutes it has.  It is because of the health charities that CIHR has a legislated KT mandate. Because of the health charities, run by citizens engaged in their health causes, the Canadian government (via CIHR) now invests over $800M per year creating new knowledge and translating that knowledge new health services, policies and products.

The US can benefit from a social Bayh Dole Act. To get there it will need the advocacy of an engaged and coordinated community sector that demands a public return on public investments in research.  It will also need a government that listens to Americans and acts as the Canadian government did in 2000 when it passed the CIHR Act.

All the US needs to do is develop an engaged community sector and elect a government that will listen.


Stephen Linder (The University of Texas School of Public Health) and David Phipps (RIR-York) giving KMb Advice to Americans

KMb press release / MdC communiqué de presse

York University and United Way of York Region examine link between living conditions and health. Two funding announcements will move university research into communities.

L’Université York et United Way de la région de York examinent les liens entre les conditions de vie et la santé.  L’annonce du financement de deux projets va permettre à la recherche universitaire de rejoindre les communautés

First posted by York University.

TORONTO, June 15, 2011 −If where you’re born, live and work − and the healthcare system you access − determines a lot about how healthy you’ll be, what can local governments and community agencies do to improve your well-being?

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has awarded York University and the United Way of York Region $93,000 to develop research initiatives that will examine how living conditions − the social determinants of health − affect health.

The funding, being announced today at York University’s fifth annual Knowledge Mobilization Expo at the Markham Convergence Centre, will be used for projects that will draw on the university’s strong interdisciplinary health research to respond to community needs and systemic social challenges identified by United Way of York Region.

“Social determinants of health are experienced where Canadians live − right in their communities,” said Ian Graham, vice-president of Knowledge Translation at CIHR. “University researchers and their partners in community health agencies, including those supported by the United Way, are critical to developing novel health services and health policies that have a direct outcome on the health of Canadians.”

“Collaborating and making research more accessible to our community partners and co-developing knowledge is a cornerstone of York University’s research enterprise,” said Stan Shapson, vice-president Research & Innovation. “For the last five years, we have collaborated with the United Way of York Region to connect researchers and graduate students with community and government organizations to find novel approaches that impact health and human services. York’s faculty members and our partners in community health agencies continue to work together to create innovative solutions that benefit the quality of life in our community.”

United Way of York Region is also announcing funding during the Knowledge Mobilization Expo. It is committing $150,000 through Change Inc., a social innovation incubator that it developed with York University to invest in new solutions to persistent social and health challenges faced by York Region residents. Based at the university’s research offices in York Region, Change Inc. was launched in October 2010. The United Way funding, through its Strength Investments will allow Change Inc. to provide socially-focused entrepreneurs, organizations and collaboratives with seed funding, physical space, shared administrative services and access to mentors, York researchers and graduate students. Continue reading

ResearchImpact (York) awarded over $50,000 to work with York Region

KM at York’s strong 2009 finish bodes well for 2010

On December 23, 2009, the KM Unit at York University was awarded two CIHR grants in their Meetings, Planning, and Dissemination Grant competition. One grant partners York University’s Lamarsh Centre for Research on Violence and Conflict Resolution with Kinark Child and Family Services and the York Region Children’s Aid Society. David Phipps from ResearchImpact (York University) and Sandra Cunning (Clinical Director, Research & Evaluation, Kinark Child and Family Services), along with researchers from the Lamarsh Centre were co-investigators on the application. We were awarded $39,950 for a grant titled “Using social networking to enable KT collaboration and dissemination”.

The grant will use the Kinark/Lamarsh/CAS partnership project on teen pregnancy and teen mothers in York Region to pilot social media tools provided by O3 (see our blog on October 13) as a tool for collaboration and dissemination. Based on learnings in this pilot initiative, York’s KM Unit will roll out these social media support services to other large-scale research and KM projects. The grant was ranked first in Canada in this competition. One reviewer commented, “Rationale very strong for need to share knowledge regarding available tools, particularly given the IT interests of the next generation.”

We are looking forward to working with our partners in York Region to use these tools to increase the sharing of research information to help our partners make informed decisions.

David Phipps and Daniele Zanotti, CEO of United Way of York Region, were also awarded $14,979 for an events grant titled, “Mobilizing the Best Practices of Institutional KT Services for Health and Society.” Through this grant, ResearchImpact partner universities and their local United Ways in St. John’s, Montreal, Saskatoon, and Victoria will meet with York and the United Way of York Region to learn from each others’ best practices in KM. “It is important that community agencies are working from the best knowledge available so that they can make well-informed decisions,” says Daniele. “York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit provides an avenue for community organizations to tap into the research expertise available in the University. It makes research, as well as researchers and graduate students, accessible to non-academic decision-makers.”

Thanks to all of our supporters, collaborators and KM stakeholders for a great 2009 and we look forward to working with you in 2010.